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Nice one, it should be stickied for sure! 

 One in a 100 guides who aren't troll ones which provoke other people to rage on forum about certain weapons and such.

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Thank you for posting this.  It was very informative.  I will say you might want to consider posting some lower part limit builds on exhibition, as the 55 limit doesn't unlock until 19 with engineers. 

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Ouch, lvl 19? I had it since creating my account thanks to a closed beta participation reward. Thanks for the info, I'll try building a low-part version soon. What's the limit around, say, lvl 6?

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Level 1: 20
Level 3: 25
Level 5: 30
Level 7: 35
Level 10: 40
Level 13: 45
Level 16: 50
Level 19: 56
Level 22: 62
Level 25: 68
Level 28: 74
Level 30: 80

And I believe any pay for pack will jump you to 55, I think.

Edit: I doubt you'll make much for a level 6, but I posted the numbers just to help you know what you had to play with at what levels.

Edited by *ThoughtfulMoron
For informations!
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Items 1. Twin wheels have 75 PS not 60

Items 3. Just to mention, a scope (Enemy detection radius increased to 350 m.) is like a radar  (Increases enemy detection radius to 300 m.), the scope is rare and needs 1 power, the radar is common but sometimes you have 1 power left on cannon builds. https://crossoutdb.com/search/1/?query=&rarity=&category=hardware&faction=&rmditems=False

Items 4. " Other Unpowered engines" - Is not only light engine unpowered, all others costs 1-2 power?

But over all (+)

Edited by EGO_Aut
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I dislike video guides, so it's perfect for me lol.  I like reading information, and re-reading it.  Cntrl+f to what I need, re-read, save in a document, etc.  So much easier for me. 

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Thanks for the list ThoughtfulMoron - exactly what I needed.

Thank you EGO_Aut for the feedback, I'll update the guide accordingly (and credit you, of course).

10 minutes ago, TheCatPlaysGamez said:

nice guide, but a tad long for a non-video guide.

You're kidding, right? I can fully relate to laziness, but reading is good for you. Consider doing it more often. :)

Edited by Gessie
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51 minutes ago, TheCatPlaysGamez said:

nice guide, but a tad long for a non-video guide.

 

Dont get me wrong Cat, your video guides are very nice indeed. :) But as far as information delivery is concerned, nothing beat text. It can be read much faster than any video can explain the same thing.

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+1

Very nice universal guide.

 

A bit too long for newbies, but definitely worth a bookmark for players, that already have the basics covered.

Edited by Steelwolve
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2 hours ago, ARES_IV said:

 

Dont get me wrong Cat, your video guides are very nice indeed. :) But as far as information delivery is concerned, nothing beat text. It can be read much faster than any video can explain the same thing.

true but i prefer to listening to things instead of reading haha, i mean i do read books, but for informative stuff i prever a video or a sound fragment.

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Does wheel count truly affect speed? I haven't noticed that it would. Acceleration, definitely, but speed?

My 6-wheeled racecar does not fall behind 4-wheelers in straight bits when boosters aren't being used, and generally overtakes them in corners and uphills due to superior grip.

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Overall speed is partly a derivative of acceleration. Top speed only becomes relevant once acceleration is sufficient.

I'll try to explain my understanding of the subject, though I could be wrong: The effects of wheels become more obvious once you consider the math behind them: Firstly, each increases both max tonnage and weight. The difference between these is your net mass cap increase. Mass cap determines how much each individual point of weight reduces the "power" (torque) of the overall vehicle.

So, a 500/1000 (50% encumbered) vehicle will be penalized far more than a 2000/10000 vehicle (20%), though the weight on the latter is much higher.

Secondly, every wheel added to the vehicle deducts torque from the cabin. Torque is the positive factor in acceleration along with grip, as both are needed. In other words, wheels you don't need lower your acceleration potential directly. As I understand it (again, could be wrong), torque is applied to the vehicle, not each individual wheel; it doesn't matter how many touch the ground, explaining how wrecks with 1 wheel can still accelerate.

You can find the technical statistics of each type of wheel using the spreadsheet I mentioned in Building > Items > 8 (recently added).


Now, time for SCIENCE! It's generally unwise to compare different vehicles to one another and draw conclusions regarding individual items based on observed performance. There are too many factors, some of which we might not have discovered yet.

To compare them accurately, create two identical vehicles, swapping only the wheels on one of them. Then either do a mathematically sound test, by holding W as soon as the Test Drive starts and precisely clocking your acceleration time (let go immediately after) and noting how far you've moved within that time.

Or, do a large amount of subjective tests: Drive 20-30 laps around the test course with each vehicle, again noting the times you get. Switch between the two frequently as your skill will rise after a few laps.

Let me know if anyone decides to do either. I'll do the same and we can compare notes; we'll need several confirmations before we have something conclusive.

Edited by Gessie
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Thanks for the guide Gessie, I found this game a couple weeks ago, and think your advice will be very helpful; however, there are a couple minor things that I've figured out that might make good additions for the guide.

 

I've tried the burst fire method of firing machine guns, but I think I've developed a way to improve it. I set half my MGs to fire when I left click, and the rest to fire when I right click. when I right click. This allows me to shoot continuously for ten times as long as regular fire by alternating between mouse buttons, while still giving me the option of regular burst fire if it suits the situation better. I've sometimes managed to achieve MVP status with only assists using this method, simply because the constant stream of bullets allows me to hit every single vehicle I see for a small amount of damage, and means I always have some cooldown left to shoot off a gun or two from a nearby enemy.

I was testing out different ways of placing passive melee weapons in the attempt to make some DIY rocket spears out of fuel barrels, when I noticed something strange: passive melee weapons only take impact damage if it comes from another melee weapon. And even then, the damage doesn't seem to spread to connected parts unless you're going fast enough to hit those immediately afterward. After making this discovery, I've been protecting my wheels using bumpers, and I haven't lost a single wheel to impact damage since. If placed correctly, you can also use them as small ramming spikes, and if you manage to shoot off someone's melee weapons before they hit you, you can make them deal loads of damage to themselves with no loss of armor in return.

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Thanks for the feedback NotASnowman.

I've decided not to include anything about weapon keys in the guide, as I consider those basic guide material. Good tip on using melee weapons to defend against melee attacks, I didn't realize that they don't transfer melee damage (or perhaps melee damage doesn't transfer in general?). Adding.

Edited by Gessie
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6 hours ago, Gessie said:

Thanks for the feedback NotASnowman.

I've decided not to include anything about weapon keys in the guide, as I consider those basic guide material. Good tip on using melee weapons to defend against melee attacks, I didn't realize that they don't transfer melee damage (or perhaps melee damage doesn't transfer in general?). Adding.

 

Just did some more tests, melee damage doesn't travel, but if you hit someone with a part and it breaks, you barely slow down or change direction, so you're likely to break a lot of your own parts if you try ramming with anything other than melee weapons and high structure armors. Melee parts seem to only take base melee damage, regardless of what you hit them with, so in a twist of irony, the best way to deal impact damage to them is to make a long line of weak parts so you smash all of them and deal multiple small amounts of damage for each one. I don't own an active melee weapon, so I don't know if their damage over time obeys the same rules as impact damage, but I think it's safe to assume that melee weapons and bumpers are a good choice to protect against those too since the initial impact damage won't even scratch you, and they'd be forced to chew through your armour without that initial damage boost.

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A general note: Reddit has joined the protest for net neutrality. I apologize for any issues you may have with the guide today, though I fully stand by this protest.

14 hours ago, NotASnowman said:

Just did some more tests...

Excellent, my results were the same. I personally wouldn't make lines of weak parts however, since part limit is a crucial factor while building, but it's well-worth trying on a creative build. :)

Another thing I've been wanting to try is to create a layered vehicle with weapons both on the exterior shell and on the cabin for backup. It's theoretically wasteful, but maybe 1-2 hidden saws are enough to troll lemmings - a noble cause.

Edited by Gessie
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5 hours ago, Gessie said:

A general note: Reddit has joined the protest for net neutrality. I apologize for any issues you may have with the guide today, though I fully stand by this protest.

Excellent, my results were the same. I personally wouldn't make lines of weak parts however, since part limit is a crucial factor while building, but it's well-worth trying on a creative build. :)

Another thing I've been wanting to try is to create a layered vehicle with weapons both on the exterior shell and on the cabin for backup. It's theoretically wasteful, but maybe 1-2 hidden saws are enough to troll lemmings - a noble cause.

 

Net neutrality is a very important issue. It cannot be defended enough.

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Just joined in on all the fun, and I have to say that the guide is enlightening.  I've been grinding my way up to Eng13, picking up whatever tricks I see as I go.  I'm still a bit baffled at how to earn my startup capital though.  I understand playing the market and crafting for profit as theories and principles, but earning the initial coin to gain access to the workbench without spending money is taking forever.

 

Is the most reliable method to simply sell scrap?  I could craft it into a Chord or similar free to craft item, but the return seems less inviting.  For instance (all prices current for example and subject to change), 100 scrap is selling for 4.33c.  Crafting a Chord uses 300 scrap, but sells for a fraction at 0.16c, and it ties up a workbench slot to boot.  Alternatively, I could craft DIY containers and hope I get lucky enough to get a blue to sell for startup money, but that seems equally counterproductive and frustrating.

 

Farming fuel has provided me with another possible revenue stream, but until I've played long enough to see how much fuel I will be consuming, I'm hesitant to part with it.

 

Any thoughts are appreciated.  Many thanks for the effort you've put into educating me thus far.

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2 hours ago, Inaeo said:

Just joined in on all the fun, and I have to say that the guide is enlightening.  I've been grinding my way up to Eng13, picking up whatever tricks I see as I go.  I'm still a bit baffled at how to earn my startup capital though.  I understand playing the market and crafting for profit as theories and principles, but earning the initial coin to gain access to the workbench without spending money is taking forever.

 

Is the most reliable method to simply sell scrap?  I could craft it into a Chord or similar free to craft item, but the return seems less inviting.  For instance (all prices current for example and subject to change), 100 scrap is selling for 4.33c.  Crafting a Chord uses 300 scrap, but sells for a fraction at 0.16c, and it ties up a workbench slot to boot.  Alternatively, I could craft DIY containers and hope I get lucky enough to get a blue to sell for startup money, but that seems equally counterproductive and frustrating.

If my years of playing the Steam Community Market has taught me anything, then you need to weigh up all the ways an action can cause profit or loss before proceeding. When it comes to loot boxes like the DIY container, the value on the market often settles at a slightly higher price than the average value of items it contains, unless the comtainer's value manipulated in some way.

DIY containers are only worth opening if you get them for free, and even then you'll probably just break even against their sale price. If you buy them from the market you'll probably make a loss of 10% overall, with potential loss being much higher for purchasing in small quantities. Crafting them yields an even greater loss margin, as the materials that go into making these containers are worth more than the containers themselves.

If you want to make some starting capital, my advice is simple: save up enough scrap to be able to sell at the highest stack size on the market, then that amount in the most profitable way you can. There's usually some difference in the price per unit between the larger and smaller stack sizes, and prices tend to change over time, so you'll need to check both to see which size is best to sell. You should also go into the "seasons" tab and start working on relevant tasks. these will give you some bonus resources, and you can change between the three difficulties at any time. Use this to maximise the output of the missions and raids you take part in. The normal and hard seasons also reward you with resources other than scrap, you'll find this useful later down the line, but the quantities you'll gain are quite small, so it wouldn't really hurt you to sell this too if you're short for cash in the early game.

If you're going to sell a resource other than scrap, then the advice I gave you about selling will stay the same, with one exception. I advise that you don't sell fuel until you get the large fuel barrel. The rate you can grind fuel before getting this item is tiny, half of what you can earn from this barrel alone, and a third of the amount you get from using both together. The fuel you earn from the small barrel should be saved in case you need it for something; fuel isn't worth buying until much later in your Crossout career, and like you said, you have no idea how much you're going to use later down the line.

The final tip I can give you about earning funds is that you should check the prices of what you'll earn on a mission before doing it by right clicking on their images. The base items you earn are used in crafting, and the value of crafted items depends on the whims of the playerbase, so sometimes items have a higher value than you'd expect. If you're unsure, the "Get the Cannons" mission is usually a safe bet. 

Just one thing you should bare in mind before taking my advice: unless someone with more experience says otherwise, take everything I say with a grain of salt. My advice mostly comes from my knowledge of markets outside of Crossout, so there might be a Crossout-specific money making option that's easier than what I've suggested that I don't know about.

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1 hour ago, NotASnowman said:

If my years of playing the Steam Community Market has taught me anything, then you need to weigh up all the ways an action can cause profit or loss before proceeding. When it comes to loot boxes like the DIY container, the value on the market often settles at a slightly higher price than the average value of items it contains, unless the comtainer's value manipulated in some way.

DIY containers are only worth opening if you get them for free, and even then you'll probably just break even against their sale price. If you buy them from the market you'll probably make a loss of 10% overall, with potential loss being much higher for purchasing in small quantities. Crafting them yields an even greater loss margin, as the materials that go into making these containers are worth more than the containers themselves.

If you want to make some starting capital, my advice is simple: save up enough scrap to be able to sell at the highest stack size on the market, then that amount in the most profitable way you can. There's usually some difference in the price per unit between the larger and smaller stack sizes, and prices tend to change over time, so you'll need to check both to see which size is best to sell. You should also go into the "seasons" tab and start working on relevant tasks. these will give you some bonus resources, and you can change between the three difficulties at any time. Use this to maximise the output of the missions and raids you take part in. The normal and hard seasons also reward you with resources other than scrap, you'll find this useful later down the line, but the quantities you'll gain are quite small, so it wouldn't really hurt you to sell this too if you're short for cash in the early game.

If you're going to sell a resource other than scrap, then the advice I gave you about selling will stay the same, with one exception. I advise that you don't sell fuel until you get the large fuel barrel. The rate you can grind fuel before getting this item is tiny, half of what you can earn from this barrel alone, and a third of the amount you get from using both together. The fuel you earn from the small barrel should be saved in case you need it for something; fuel isn't worth buying until much later in your Crossout career, and like you said, you have no idea how much you're going to use later down the line.

The final tip I can give you about earning funds is that you should check the prices of what you'll earn on a mission before doing it by right clicking on their images. The base items you earn are used in crafting, and the value of crafted items depends on the whims of the playerbase, so sometimes items have a higher value than you'd expect. If you're unsure, the "Get the Cannons" mission is usually a safe bet. 

Just one thing you should bare in mind before taking my advice: unless someone with more experience says otherwise, take everything I say with a grain of salt. My advice mostly comes from my knowledge of markets outside of Crossout, so there might be a Crossout-specific money making option that's easier than what I've suggested that I don't know about.

That's about what I had gathered as well, but I wasn't sure if I was missing something major in my approach.  I have a bunch of scrap on the market now, with the hopes of earning enough coin to rent workbench space, but I now find myself needing to grind scrap again so that when the offer sells, I'll have enough to actually craft what I was after in the first place (Fuel+tank is high on my list).

I have been varying my missions, mostly in the hopes of collecting useful things.  As you said, they are all base ingredients for larger prizes, so I've done what I can to stock up as I scout through the recipes to determine priorities.  I've been working toward some season goals, but I don't have the equipment to complete many of them at this point, so the small rewards have just been a bit of gravy as I go about my other business.

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The best advice for you, in my opinion, is also #1 in my Earning Cash section:

Quote

Play the market for profit. Impatient players want to give you their money - oblige them. Low value items tend to earn a relatively large profit, such as the lowly Chord, which is great for starting out; 50% margins are common.

More specifically, just buy Chords, Lupera's, Small Wheels, Medium Wheels or some other low level white item for 0.01 more than the best buy offer, and sell for 0.01 less than the best sell offer. Try to trade at least two different items, and make sure they trade fast.

Alternatively, you could just play PvP, being sure to add the blue Fuel+ tank, as your earnings through trading won't be huge just yet. If you can't afford it, trade until you can, pop it on and play. By then, you can also start trading blues one at a time, which earns you 2-3 coins each trade.

Sometimes you get lucky: Earlier today, Sidekick Drones were bought at 26 and sold at 36. The bidding war was intense, however.

Thanks for the question by the way, it's inspired me to highlight parts of the second sentence as well. I'm aware how dense/compact the guide is, so it can be difficult to find something. :)

Edited by Gessie

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