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dukerustfield

Rotation Speed

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yep, thats how the rotation with legs and hovers works.

give this a spin...or 50. it actually jumps with both legs. also funny to watch when you match camera rotation to build rotation

image.png.d14955ad53e91852d47c56e7b205c0

Edited by forc3dinduction
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It's not just legs and hovers.

Modern cars have a turning radius. That is dictated by the position of the tires and much they can turn. Little cars can usually make very tight turning circles. Because their wheels are closer together. But "cornering" is your ability to take turns fast without losing traction. And that depends on your wheels being further apart. Same applies in Crossout.

If you put armored tracks on a 4x4 and a Growl or Quantum cabin in there, it will turn so fast it will flip over pretty much constantly. And you don't think of armored tracks as being very agile. The closest you can any wheels like that together is Grinders. You can put them separated by a single 2x4. And any cabin can sit on top. It will have extremely tight cornering. But it will flip over because of it.

It's just that with hovers and legs it's a lot harder to actually flip yourself. But similar concepts apply.

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Here are a few additions to this.

What determines a car’s turning radius?

It depends on the maximum angle the front wheel can turn and the wheel base (distance between the front and rear wheels). Assuming that most vehicles front wheel will turn about 30 degrees then the shorter wheel base vehicle will have smaller turning radius.

Nerds:

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The closer your steering wheels are together (left to right), the tighter you will turn. The closer your wheelbase is together (front to back), the tighter you will turn.

But Crossout is capable of all sorts of crazy wheel combinations. There is a difference in suspension (how squishy they are) among wheels. Taller wheels tend to be squishier. That matters when turning at speed. Some wheels stick out far from the frame. Big Foots and Lunar Wheels stick out very far. Contrast those wheels with Large Wheels or APC wheels which are basically right up against the frame where they are mounted. That allows them to turn tighter, in theory. And the tires themselves can have different surface areas. Large Wheels are very narrow and you will drift, oversteer, skid, a lot. In contrast, Twin Wheels are very wide. That gives you added stability in turning, but it also increases your turning radius because you measure from the midpoint of the wheels.

I'm not sure if there is different tilt angles of wheels. Meaning, do the wheels tilt while turning or do they remain flat? And I'm not sure if different wheels can turn at different angles.
 

 

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1 hour ago, dukerustfield said:

And I'm not sure if different wheels can turn at different angles.

Afaik all have same turn angle even if visually some turn more than others (lunar wheels for example). The car's turn radius stays the same.

Also some people say all (blue) wheels have the same grip which i think is not true. They are all affected the same by different surfaces, but still each type of wheel behaves different regarding drifting/grip.

Edited by fftunes4real

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You mean camber. Camber usually is static. It would be visible even when driving a straight line. Unless there is positive or negative caster angle.

Have not noticed either.

Even if they tilted at different dampener compression levels i doubt it would be reflected in the wheel / grip "simulation".

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43 minutes ago, dukerustfield said:

I think surface area of wheels makes a big difference. You can see it when wheels, for whatever reason, have less of their surface touching.

Yes. Twin wheels for example also have more traction than most other wheels.

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